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Exhibition Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I

Al Piantadosi and Alfred Bryan. "I Didn't Raise My Boy to be a Soldier." New York: Leo Feist, Inc., 1915. Sheet Music. Music Division, Library of Congress (033.00.00)
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Minnie May Bauer and Gus Dattilo. "Don't Marry a Slacker, Girls." Louisville: Gus Dattilo, 1917. Sheet Music. Music Division, Library of Congress (034.00.00)
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Jack Frost and James White. “Neutrality Rag.” Chicago: Frank K. Root and Company, December 1915. Sheet music cover. Music Division, Library of Congress (008.01.00)
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Arthur Lange and Andrew Sterling. “America Here's My Boy.” New York: Joe Morris Music Co., February 1917. Sheet music cover. Music Division, Library of Congress (008.02.00)
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Answer Songs

"I Didn't Raise My Boy to Be a Soldier," published in January 1915, a few months after war broke out in Europe became a rallying cry for the nation's pacifists. Reflecting the official U.S. policy of neutrality, the song was one of the most popular of the era. Two years later, after America entered the war, "answer" songs, such as "I Didn't Raise My Boy to Be a Slacker," "I Didn't Raise My Boy to Be a Coward," and "Don't Marry a Slacker, Girls" offered a decidedly pro-war sentiment. The Library of Congress holds more than 14,000 pieces of sheet music relating to World War I.

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