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Exhibition Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I

Albert Burleson to Joseph Tumulty, May 11, 1918. Albert Burleson Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (024.00.00)
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Albert Burleson to Joseph Tumulty, May 11, 1918. Albert Burleson Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (024.00.00)
Enlarge
Albert Burleson to Joseph Tumulty, May 11, 1918. Albert Burleson Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (024.00.00)
Enlarge
Albert Burleson to Joseph Tumulty, May 11, 1918. Albert Burleson Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (024.00.00)
Enlarge
Albert Burleson to Joseph Tumulty, May 11, 1918. Albert Burleson Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (024.00.00)
Enlarge
Albert Burleson to Joseph Tumulty, May 11, 1918. Albert Burleson Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (024.00.00)
Enlarge
Albert Burleson to Joseph Tumulty, May 11, 1918. Albert Burleson Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (024.00.00)
Enlarge
Albert Burleson to Joseph Tumulty, May 11, 1918. Albert Burleson Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (024.00.00)
Enlarge

Controlling the Message

Whether censoring the mail, organizing communication networks through government control of the telegraph, or advising President Wilson on postwar policies, Postmaster General Albert Burleson played a central role in the Wilson administration and in mobilizing war support on the home front. This letter from Burleson to Wilson's private secretary, Joseph Tumulty, demonstrates the extent to which Wilson and his advisers believed the war to be an opportunity to reconstruct America domestically to better benefit average Americans while also reshaping international relations into a durable peace.

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