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Exhibition Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I

W. E. B. Du Bois to the NAACP, January 12, 1919. NAACP Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (175.00.00, 175.00.01)
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W. E. B. Du Bois to the NAACP, January 12, 1919. NAACP Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (175.00.00, 175.00.01)
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W. E. B. Du Bois to the NAACP, January 12, 1919. NAACP Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (175.00.00, 175.00.01)
Enlarge
W. E. B. Du Bois to the NAACP, January 12, 1919. NAACP Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (175.00.00, 175.00.01)
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W. E. B. Du Bois to the NAACP, January 12, 1919. NAACP Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (175.00.00, 175.00.01)
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"A Session of the Pan-African Congress, Paris, February 19–22, 1919" in The Crisis, A Record of the Darker Races. [Reprint] NY: Arno Press, 1969. General Collections, Library of Congress (174.01.00)
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W. E. B. Du Bois to the NAACP, Bulletin #3, January 1919. “My programme is this. . . . I am to meet colored French deputies soon to plan for a Pan-African Conference in Paris during the Peace Conference.” NAACP Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress (175.01.00)
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The Pan African Conference

During the war, the interaction of African colonial troops and black American soldiers helped to establish a distinct strain of pan-African politics. NAACP co-founder and civil rights leader W. E. B. Du Bois and Senegalese official Blaise Diagne organized the Pan African Conference of 1919. Held over three days in February, it brought together fifty-seven delegates from Africa, the West Indies, and the United States and helped to create a foundation for the development of black internationalism that contributed to African and Asian independence movements in the decades that followed World War I.

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