Book/Printed Material Social dancing inconsistent with a Christian profession and baptismal vows a sermon, preached in the Presbyterian Church, Columbia, S.C., June 17, 1849 Sermon on social dancing

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About this Item

Title
Social dancing inconsistent with a Christian profession and baptismal vows a sermon, preached in the Presbyterian Church, Columbia, S.C., June 17, 1849
Other Title
Sermon on social dancing
Contributor Names
Palmer, B. M. (Benjamin Morgan) -- 1818-1902
Created / Published
Printed at the Office of the South Carolinian, Columbia, 1849, monographic.
Subject Headings
-  Dance -- Religious aspects -- Christianity -- Sermons
-  Sermons, American
-  Antidance Literature
Genre
book
Notes
-  by B. M. Palmer, pastor. (statement of responsibility)
-  Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as facsimile page images and full text. (additional physical form)
Form
print
electronic resource
remote
Extent
23 p. 19 cm.
Repository
Music Division
Library of Congress Control Number
47037037
Online Format
online text
pdf
image
Description
Book. print | 23 p. 19 cm. | by B. M. Palmer, pastor. (Statement Of Responsibility). Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as facsimile page images and full text. (Additional Physical Form). Print (Form). Electronic Resource (Form). Remote (Form). In bringing this discourse to a close, I trust, my Brethren, you will do me the justice to believe that it has not been easy for me to say all that I have uttered. But we are hurrying to the Judgment Bar, and there is no time for soft and honeyed phrases, when your souls and the souls of your children are at stake. Endeared as my relations are to you, I would cheerfully close this Bible never again to open it, and, like the Spartan law-giver, go into perpetual exile from this pulpit, if this step would stamp these instructions ineffaceably upon your hearts. There is no curse with which a righteous God can afflict this apostate earth equal to that of an unconverted, unsanctified, pleasure-loving Church. Better that the plough of desecration should turn up the bones of our common dead in that graveyard—better that he whirlwind of God's anger should destroy this temple, in which you and your fathers have worshipped—better that blasting and mildew should make this consecrated spot a terrible monument of the divine displeasure—better that we should now be summoned, as we sit together on these seats, to meet at once our last account—than that we should live a cold, dead Church, sending forth our blighting influence upon 0025 23 the ungodly around us. Remember, an important part of our testimony is the witness we bear for experimental religion. Let not Pastor, Elders, and people, enter into an unholy conspiracy to betray Christ through his cause. Let us “have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them.” Let us “walk honestly as in the day; not in chambering and wantonness, not in rioting and drunkenness, not in strife and envying.” “Let us make no provision for the flesh to fulfil the lasts thereof;” but rather let us “live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present evil world, denying all ungodliness and worldly lusts;” “looking for and hasting unto the day of God, when the Son of Man shall be revealed to be glorified in his Saints.” And to “as many as walk according to this rule, peace be on them and mercy, and upon the Israel of God.”
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https://0-lccn.loc.gov.oasys.lib.oxy.edu/47037037
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The accompanying videos were produced by the Library of Congress. Note Video Performers for additional credits for video performers.

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Music Division.

Video Performers

Performers for the October 1997 Great Hall event: Dancers

Members of The Jonquil Street Foundation, Inc. Ariane Anthony, Thomas Baird, Barbara Barr, Patricia Beaman, Christopher Caines, Charles Garth, James Martin, Maris Wolff. Musicians - members of The Library of Congress Centennial Cotillion Brass Band, Emerson Head and Robert Sheldon, Leaders (Members, Metro Washington D.C. Federation of Musicians Local 161-710, AFM.)

Performers for the Coolidge Auditorium clips: Dancers

Cheryl Stafford and Thomas Baird. Musicians - Boris Gurevitch (piano), Susan Manus (violin).

Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Palmer, B. M. Social dancing inconsistent with a Christian profession and baptismal vows a sermon, preached in the Presbyterian Church, Columbia, S.C. Printed at the Office of the South Carolinian, Columbia, monographic, 1849. Pdf. https://0-www.loc.gov.oasys.lib.oxy.edu/item/47037037/.

APA citation style:

Palmer, B. M. (1849) Social dancing inconsistent with a Christian profession and baptismal vows a sermon, preached in the Presbyterian Church, Columbia, S.C. Printed at the Office of the South Carolinian, Columbia, monographic. [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://0-www.loc.gov.oasys.lib.oxy.edu/item/47037037/.

MLA citation style:

Palmer, B. M. Social dancing inconsistent with a Christian profession and baptismal vows a sermon, preached in the Presbyterian Church, Columbia, S.C. Printed at the Office of the South Carolinian, Columbia, monographic, 1849. Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/47037037/>.