student/intern Junior Fellows Summer Internship Program

  • Hosting Service Unit: All Library of Congress
  • Program Contact: [email protected]
  • Interests/Areas of Study: STEM; Collections Conservation and Preservation; Law; Business; Humanities, Art and Culture; Library Information Science; Communications; Chemistry and Science; Congressional Relations; Geography and Maps; Government and Business Administration; Information Technology; Legislative Information; Policy Analysis; Public Relations; Cataloguing; Copyright; Digital Stewardship; Education; Finance; Outreach; Project & Project Management; Research; Web Services
  • Citizenship: U.S. Citizen
  • Application Period: Annually
  • Application Notes: See below for: A. General FAQ on all the programs available at the Library; B. Specific FAQ on the Junior Fellows Program; C. Specific information on the program including project descriptions D. Apply for the 2019 internship at USAJobs in December 2018.
  • Compensation: $4,500.00 (taxable income of $450.00 per week)
  • Academic Credit: The Library does not provide academic credit, but you may arrange with your school in advance to receive credit.
  • Available Benefits: Transit. LC Internal Discounts.
  • Program Duration: Short-term. May 28th - August 2nd, 2019
  • Qualifications: Currently Enrolled Students (Undergraduate, Graduate) or have graduated in the months of December 2018-June 2019
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Please see below for the following information on the program:

Program Overview

The Library of Congress Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program enables undergraduate and graduate students to experience the integrated analog and digital collections and services of the world's largest, all-inclusive library. Working under the direction of Library curators and specialists in various divisions, fellows explore digital initiatives and increase access to the institution’s unparalleled collections and resources. Fellows are exposed to a broad spectrum of library work: copyright, preservation, reference, access, and information technology. In the past, summer fellows have identified hundreds of historical, literary, artistic, cinematic and musical gems representing the Library’s rich cultural, creative and intellectual assets. No previous experience is necessary, but fellowships are competitive and special skills or knowledge are usually desired. Selections are based on academic achievement, letters of recommendation, and an interview with a selection official

Program Focus

The focus of the program is to increase access to special, legal and copyright collections, and to promote awareness and appreciation of the Library's services to researchers including Congressional members, scholars, students, teachers, and the general public. Fellows encourage the use of collections and services − ensuring that the Library of Congress is known as a living, dynamic center for scholarly work and connections. Program participants inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve, and research collections in varied formats, as well as assist in digital library initiatives. Upon completion of their assignments, fellows work closely with Library curators and specialists to plan and present a display of their most significant discoveries and accomplishments.

The Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program is made possible by a generous gift from James Madison Council member Nancy Glanville Jewell through the Glanville Family Foundation and from the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund, which was established with a lead gift from H. F. (Gerry) Lenfest, former chairman of the Madison Council, and with major support provided by members of the Council. The program was originally made possible through the generosity of the late Mrs. Jefferson Patterson.

The Junior Fellows Program offers a paid ten week internship for undergraduate and graduate students working with Library of Congress collections. The fellows explore digital initiatives and inventory, catalog, arrange, preserve and research a backlog of special, legal or copyright collections in many different formats.

 

Applications for the 2019 Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program will be available (tentatively) December 10, 2018 through January 11, 2019 on USAJOBS.gov. Incomplete application packages will not be considered.

Selection Process

Applications will be forwarded to selecting officials in the Library who will arrange telephone interviews with promising applicants, based on materials submitted. After completion of the selection process those selected will be provided with detailed information on reporting for their fellowship.

The Library of Congress is an equal opportunity employer. Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities who meet eligibility requirements are strongly encouraged to apply.

Projects for 2019

 

Project Names

Below are the 2019 summer project descriptions, to present the scope and range of work Junior Fellows conduct.

Junior Fellows 2019 Projects

  • #01 – 18th Century Statutes - France and New France (Law Library)

    Short Description: The Law Library is in possession of documents, consisting of royal decrees and decisions of the French royal council from King Louis XIV to King Louis XVI which touch upon trade, taxation, finance and other legal matters. The fellow will perform bibliographic research on documents in the collection in order to identify and make the materials accessible to the public.

    Full Description:

    1. The Law Library is in possession of 44 document boxes of uncatalogued printed legal documents representing royal decrees and decisions of the French royal council from the reigns of King Louis XIV-King Louis XVI. Total count is over 4000 documents.
    2. The documents include “Arrests du Conseil Du Roy” (Decisions of the Royal Council), “Declarations Du Roy” (Declarations of the King) and “Edits du Roy” (Edicts of the King). These touch upon trade, taxation, finance, property law, ecclesiastical property, and letters patent and relate to all jurisdictions under the dominion of the King of France.
    3. The purpose of this project is to make this collection accessible to public. To accomplish this, the intern will record bibliographic information for each of the documents in the collection. The intern will also rehouse the items, which are currently housed in over-crowded document boxes.
    4. The focus of this project is collection work.
    5. The intern performs bibliographic research on each document in the collection in order to identify and record: title, publication location, publication date, publication authority, pagination, dimensions, collation, and other copies of the items in the Library of Congress and in other institutions. This work lays groundwork for future full cataloging of the entire collection.

     

    Skills/Knowledge Desired:

    • Knowledge of French at a high level of fluency;
    • Knowledge of French colonial history, French history, legal history or a related field;
    • Capability to perform bibliographic research in the Library of Congress OPAC; Capability to use Microsoft Excel; Experience in compiling reports including precise statistics and factual data of a high degree of specificity.

     

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of basic principles of bibliographic description

  • #02 – Copyright Archival Records Digitization (U.S. Office of Copyright)

    Short description: The United States Copyright Office “is responsible for administering a complex and dynamic set of laws, which include registration, the recordation of title and licenses, a number of statutory licensing provisions, and other aspects of the 1976 Copyright Act and the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act.” The fellow will research, conduct an inventory, organize, and make recommendations on digitization of archive of copyright bibliographic files.

    Full description: Research, inventory, organize, and make recommendations on digitization of archive of copyright bibliographic files, developed and long-used by Copyright Office staff for reports on the copyright status of works. The Fellow will recommend a metadata scheme and populate a database for the materials. Fellow will exercise judgment and creativity in highlighting materials of greater interest and will work with professional staff to create engaging and interactive webpages for selected digitized materials. Fellow will also select materials for a one-day display.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired:

    • Ability to use MS Excel or Access; Ability to communicate in writing;
    • Ability to work collaboratively with others;
    • Ability to present information orally through briefings and presentations;
    • Experience processing collections;
    • Skill in researching, analyzing, and developing assessments;
    • Ability to plan, organize, and maintain an efficient workflow

     

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Ability to communicate in writing; Experience processing collections

  • #03 – Climate Change & National Defense (Congressional Research Service)

    Short Description: The fellow will review defense policy and literature in order to research Department of Defense infrastructure and operational responses to natural disasters in the U.S. and provide reports for congressional deliberations on the issues.

    Full Description: Recent damage to or outright destruction of DOD infrastructure and DOD operational responses to natural disasters in the U.S. and its possessions have imposed additional financial and operational burdens on DOD and the nation. Numerous congressional clients have queried CRS concerning the effects of climate change on Department of Defense infrastructure and how climate change may contribute to the demands placed on the U.S. military, given the expected effects of climate change on natural resources. The fellows would be expected to review scientific and defense policy literature and defense infrastructure reports to provide unbiased, non-partisan authoritative, and very timely context for congressional deliberations on this issue.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired:  Familiarity with DOD’s worldwide basing posture; Knowledge of the science and resources associated with climate change.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Familiarity with navigating the U.S. code in Lexis Nexis.

  • #04 – Women’s Suffrage Primary Resources Guide (K-12) (Learning and Innovation Office)

    Short description: The fellow will assist in highlighting items related to women’s suffrage in the U.S. found in the Library’s historical collections. This project aims to bring together unique and complex primary sources related to women’s suffrage to create resources for K-12 classrooms, educators, and other researchers on the complexity of the subject matter. In addition to their research, the fellow will draft material and promotional material for informing the public about this resource, in addition to drafting student exploration activities to be piloted in the Library’s Young Readers Center.

    Full Description: The Learning and Innovation office of the Library of Congress, as a service to the nation's K-12 educators and learners, provides materials and programs that support the effective classroom use and exploration of historical primary sources. The 2019 fellow will contribute to the development of an educational resource highlighting items from the historical collections of the Library of Congress related to women’s suffrage and supporting teacher professional development and student exploration related to those collections. Duties will include conducting research on the topics; selecting online primary sources from the Library's collections for inclusion in the teacher resource; drafting text for background materials; helping draft student exploration activities to be piloted in the Library's Young Readers Center; brainstorming promotional ideas for spreading the word about the resource in the K-12 educational community.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to conduct online and offline research; Writing for an educational audience; Academic background in either U.S. history or K-12 education.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Ability to work well as part of a team; Familiarity with current K-12 educational practices and issues.

  • #05 – Literary Story Maps  (Center for the Book)

    Short description: The Center for the Book (CFB) looks for a fellow who will organize and refine American Fiction datasets and continue producing a road map for implementing the Library of Congress’ Literary Maps incorporating MARC records for fictional books. The fellow will also ensure consistency with the metadata structure and program in Esri ArcGIS.

    Full description: Working with a Junior Fellow, in the summer of 2017 the Center for the Book began exploring consistencies with geographic identifiers in the Library’s MARC records. The 2017 work involved working with a subset of the 25 million MARC records in order to build a metadata structure for use with the ESRI ArcGIS system in producing literary maps. For the summer of 2018, the Center for the Book is requesting a Junior Fellow who can build upon this work. The Junior Fellow will be asked to further refine the American Fiction datasets and work with Library cataloguers to identify and produce a road map for implementing the standards for field 651 in the MARC records. Due to the high volume of records and inconsistent data, the project will involve examining a potential crowdsourcing element. The end goal of this project overall is to have a complete and consistent database of georeferenced MARC records and American Fiction.

    The Junior Fellow should be a student enrolled in Library Sciences or Computer Sciences (graduate programs preferred); have an interest in American literature; possess intermediate to advanced skills in handling datasets and working with software applications; and be a good presenter for the project.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of or experience with literary or story maps; Web authoring programs such as JavaScript or HTML; ArcGIS knowledge or experience preferred

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Graduate or advanced undergraduate with coursework in LIS or Computer Science; Ability to work as part of a team; Good communication skills; Interest in literature; Proficient in Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint.

  • #06 –Archiving the National Book Festival (Signature Programs Office)

    Short description: The Library of Congress National Book Festival is a premier national book event, drawing highly acclaimed authors as participants and thousands of attendees. The fellow will be exposed to the inner working of a major festival and work to create historical and planning records of the festival with a rich history. Possible projects include authoring a written history of the NBF, suggesting recommendations for the revamp of the NBF Website, producing a digital guide, or an audit of NBF patrons.

    Full description:

    1. The Library of Congress National Book Festival is a premier national book event, drawing highly acclaimed authors as participants and thousands of attendees. Coordination of activities must be as near to flawless as possible. The event is highly complex and requires coordination of many tasks and details. Facilitating communications among all the players in this event is critical to a successful festival.
    2. This project will expose the Junior Fellow(s) to the inner workings of planning a major festival for a government agency.
    3. The purpose of the project is to create working historical and planning records of the festival. The fellows will also have the opportunity to attend festival meetings, and attend the festival on August 31, 2019. The work entails identifying key sections of content and reorganizing the material into more easily digestible forms (e.g. a series of podcasts with specific themes), adding metadata and additional descriptive materials where necessary. Background in humanities, information science, and basic experience with editing and processing digital audio and video files preferred.
    4. The focus of this project is Library operations, and understanding Library users
    5. The Junior Fellow(s) will create one of four deliverables, depending on assignment: a written history of the National Book Festival, recommendations for the revamp of the National Book Festival Website, a project management digital guide for the National Book Festival, or an audit of National Book Festival patrons, creating an analysis breakdown and recommendations for content, programming, sponsorship and more.

     

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to work effectively and efficiently with others; Ability to communicate in orally and in writing; Ability to apply basic project management principles, concepts and methodologies; Knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of Microsoft Project; Knowledge of best practices in website management.

  • #07 – Audience Outreach and Engagement (Library of Congress Labs)

    Short description: Launched in October 2018, Crowd.loc.gov, an innovative public engagement program and open source tool that invites the public to transcribe and tag historical documents, seeks a fellow to create visual and informative outreach materials for key audiences Labs and Crowd, in addition to researching strategies and help develop a plan campaign to reach out to desired audiences.

    Full description: The Library of Congress Labs launched in 2017 to provide a public space for innovation and iterative experimentation around our digital collections and data. We are trying to reach new audiences for digital collections and run several public-facing programs that promote digital scholarship, data visualization, and other computational uses of our collections. Crowd.loc.gov launched in October of 2018 as a public engagement program and open source tool that invites the public to transcribe and tag library collections to crease findability and use of our digital collections. We are seeking a Junior Fellow to produce visual and innovative outreach materials for key audiences that Labs and Crowd is trying to reach; research and develop messages and strategies to reach those audiences, and recommend a program to evaluate how well a message or strategy reached the desired audiences.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Clarify the goals of Labs outreach materials and messages with teams; Research and report on the key audiences for Labs.loc.gov and crowd.loc.gov.; Create a persona or other type of sketch of our key audiences to inform the messages and outreach materials; Research and report on similar communications or outreach campaigns aimed at our key audiences; Create initial drafts of outreach materials.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Develop a plan of dissemination or a sample campaign to reach select key audiences; Finalize drafts of outreach materials.

  • #08 – Data Flow Visualization (User Experience Design)

    Short description: The Library of Congress’ digital collections and data spans over 20 petabytes of data, and while a typical user may understand the basic concept of a file, the scale, file types and processes for the Library’s span of data is not well known by core user groups: Congress, Creators, Learners, and Connectors. Using a creative process, the fellow will create a visualization that explains the flow of data throughout the Library.

    Full description: The Library of Congress collects, standardizes, preserves and serves over 20 petabytes of data. While many understand the importance of a file when they use a specific file on their computer, and they especially understand the importance of a file when they are unable to use or find a specific file; the scale, file types and processes for the Library’s data is not as well known by our core user groups: Congress, Creators, Learners, and Connectors. Following the Library’s new strategy for being user-centered and data driven, this project should result in the development of a data visualization for the flow of data throughout the Library. The visualization can take any form that the junior fellow identifies as the best medium to tell an engaging story about the life of a file or data, for example a video, an animation, a graphical information design, an interactive data visualization using a popular data visualization tool, or front-end code such as HTML, CSS and Javascript. This project would allow the junior fellow to take charge of an information design project from start to completion, using the visualization tools of their choice, and work with multiple areas of the Library including Design and Development, User Experience Design, Mission Platforms, Digital Collections, Communications, and other Service Units.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired:  Candidate must have good time management, interviewing skills, and organizational skills; Candidate should be familiar with how to communicate visually.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Candidate is preferred be familiar with information design concepts, and how to create data visualizations in the tools of their choice.

  • #09 – Transcultural Teaching Guide (Hispanic)

    Short description: The fellow will explore and compile resources in engaging material for use as primary sources in educational settings. Themes for the research will be transdisciplinary, and transnational, and will be the first in a series of guides for the study of Caribbean, Latin America, Spain, Portugal, and Latino communities as they exist in the U.S.

    Full description: The Hispanic Division is the gateway to nearly 13 million items available throughout the General and Special Collections covering all historic periods. The Hispanic Division Primary Resource Guide (PRG) is a transdisciplinary, transnational, and multi-format guide focusing on the use of primary sources for teaching and learning about the Caribbean, Latin America, Spain, Portugal, and Latino communities in the US. The goal of this project is to compile resources in multiple formats such as texts, images, maps, and manuscripts, helping users engage with the materials in a meaningful way and allowing them to apply critical thinking and analysis skills to the use of primary sources in the classroom. This project aims to be the first in a series of guides for the study of the Caribbean, Latin America, Spain, Portugal, and Latino communities in the US/our region of responsibility and the information cycle that follows historic events. Themes must be transdisciplinary and transnational. While topics are open, examples such as labor, public health, connected global/local cultures are offered as guidance. The fellow will conduct research in multiple custodial divisions and communicate with relevant stakeholders to secure access and inclusion in the guide, and to produce descriptive texts and educational activities. The fellow will assist in devising innovative ways to connect users with the collections, thus expanding LC service and resources to learning communities in different formats, such as online courses.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese (reading required, writing and speaking preferred); Ability to communicate in writing; Ability to communicate effectively other than in writing; Ability to work collaboratively; Knowledge of MS Word and MS Office; Independent and self-motivated.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired:

    • Knowledge of the principles, concepts, and techniques of library science
    • Experience with research in/about the Caribbean, Latin America, Spain, Portugal, Latino communities in the US;
    • Skills in HTML;
    • Experience with Adobe Photoshop (and/or other apps from the Adobe Creative Suite);
    • Ability to work effectively with diverse populations and in interdisciplinary environments.

     

  • #10 – Disney Film Music Project (Music Division)

    Short description: The fellow will compile and create an inventory of specific Disney Company film music resources currently found in the Music Division’s existing holdings. The Disney collection are among the most prolific in the Music Division as well as the most un-findable in the collections. This project aims to bring to light these culturally important resources.

    Full description:

    1. Background: Film music copyright deposits are of extraordinary scholarly value as they demonstrate filmmakers’ musical intentions in media creation as part of the production process. Music copyright deposits from the Disney Company are among the most prolific in the Music Division, but they are mostly un-findable for remote and in-person users alike. Many of these scores include unused or different cues from the released film.
    2. Subject: Music (instrumental)
    3. Scope of Work: A descriptive inventory and bibliography of music for specific Disney productions, approximately 300 films, needs to be produced. There will be some physical rehousing.
    4. This project is both collections and services-oriented. It helps move materials out of Landover and will allow future users to easily find and view Disney film music materials.
    5. Responsibilities and Tasks: Under the direct supervision of a Music Division Reference Specialist, the Fellow will collocate and create a complete inventory of Disney film music resources from the Music Division’s existing holdings. The Fellow will compile necessary metadata to facilitate creation of catalog records. If time permits, the Fellow will continue with instrumental / vocal arrangements and television music from Disney productions.

     

    Skills/Knowledge Desired:  Strong organization skills; Demonstrable experience reading music; demonstrate knowledge of music history ; curiosity about how media and music arts connect to other aspects of American and cultural studies; Evidence of research skills, especially in use of primary source materials; Computer/digital skills (e.g. data input, spreadsheet or template design, use of search fields) and willingness to learn how to use Library of Congress templates; Flexibility in working independently to problem-solve as well as collaborating within a team; Good communication and “people” skills; Familiarity with social media applications, such as tagging and blogs.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Strong background in music history, preferably at the graduate level; interest in film history and production would be helpful; excellent writing skills; some bibliographic control or cataloging experience would be helpful.

  • #11 – Martha Graham Legacy Dance Archives (Music Division)

    Short description: The Martha Graham Legacy Project seeks to make special collection materials that document Graham’s impact on American dance and culture. The fellow will perform duties to make the collections accessible to the public, along with creating material promoting the collection.

    Full description: The Martha Graham Legacy Project 2019 will create access to additional special collections that document Graham's impact on American dance and culture. The project will focus on one or more major dancers of the Graham company, whose collections are not yet fully processed and accessible: Jane Dudley of the Depression; Erick Hawkins of the 1940s-1950s (Graham’s first male dancer in the company); Helen McGehee/Umaña, Yuriko, and Ethel Winter/Charles Hyman of the 1950s-1970s, and Armgard von Bardeleben of the 1990s. Fellow(s) will perform additional archival processing, rehousing, coding of finding aids, and selective/curated scanning to make the collections accessible, along with targeted communications and outreach to alert faculty, students, and scholars about the new resources. Scope will resemble the past two summers, when Junior Fellows processed the Pearl Lang Papers, the Sophie Maslow Papers, and a good portion of related materials in the Victoria Phillips Collection, or more than 26,000 items (more than 45 linear feet in 102 boxes). Already, scholars in theatre and modern dance, Jewish/Yiddish studies, and gender studies have inquired about the collection following the blog posts of the Fellows and additional outreach with Project Mentor's guidance. Project Mentor (Smigel) has mentored Fellows (9 at LC since 2015, 29 for grant-funded project in her previous job), and project design provides Fellows with opportunities to present or public their work in social media and/or professional venues.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired:

    1. Strong organizational skills (ability to set and meet deadlines, follow work plans, and adapt plans with team input as needed). 
    2. Demonstrable interest or experience in performing arts (dance, music, design); curiosity about how arts heritage connects to other aspects of American historical and cultural studies.
    3. Evidence of research skills, especially in use of primary source materials. Ability to make connections between information from multiple sources (playbills, videos, reviews, photos).
    4. Computer/digital skills (e.g., data input, spreadsheet or template design, use of search fields) and willingness to learn how to use Library of Congress finding aid templates.
    5. Flexibility in working independently to problem-solve as well as collaborating within a team.
    6. Good communication and "people" skills.
    7. Familiarity with social media applications, such as tagging and blogs.

     

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Excellent writing skills (good writing is presumed).  Archival processing experience, creation of finding aids would be helpful. Some experience in image scanning or website maintenance, as some Graham-related materials are currently available online.

  • #12 – Hamady Perishable Press Archive (Rare Books Special Collections Division)

    Short description: Cited as one of the most influential American book artist of the 20th century, Hamady donated his entire Perishable Press Limited archive filled with manuscripts, drawings and final printings to the Library of Congress, which must now be processed and organized into a guide to allow researchers to access materials never before seen.

    Full description: Walter Samuel Hamady is an American artist, designer, printer, papermaker, and poet. He is especially known for his innovative efforts in letterpress printing, bookbinding, and papermaking, and is often cited as one of the most influential American book artists of the 20th century. In the mid-1960s, he founded The Perishable Press Limited and the Shadwell Papermill. Noted for their fine handmade paper, distinguished typography, and unique colophons, Hamady's Perishable Press publications represent a pivotal moment in the American book arts movement. Hamady has donated his entire Perishable Press archive of manuscripts, drawings, preparatory sketches, pulls, and final printings The Junior Fellow will process the entire archive. His complete set of publications will be processed. Records will be sorted, identified, arranged and housed. Preliminary drawing and pulls will be linked to the final printed piece. A register or guide will be created to allow researchers to access the various materials. The Junior Fellow will work with letters, proposals for unrealized projects, sketches and drawings along with posters, prospectuses, and announcements.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to use word processing and possibly spreadsheet software

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Familiarity with archival processing practices. Experience with working with fine press or letterpress collections.

  • #13 –US Department of Interior Maps 1890-1930 (Science, Technology and Business)

    Short description: The fellow will create an inventory of maps published by the US Department of Interior from the 1890s to the 1930s, which has previously never been inventoried to be published online as a research guide.

    Full description: The general collections contain over 1000 volumes published by the US Dept. of the Interior from the 1890's to the 1930's, some containing 4 or 5 folded maps or other inserts, others as many as 50. These inserts document by state known sources of minerals important to US industry at the time of publication (e.g. phosphate deposits in Florida in the 1890's). This material has never been inventoried. This project creates an inventory of a selected portion of this material (i.e. narrowed by industry and/or state, such as the phosphate industry in Florida from 1890-1930), to be published on the web as a Research Guide. To create the inventory, in addition to identifying and examining each insert, the Junior Fellow will search the OPAC to identify pertinent materials to be examined and prepare an introduction to the inventory describing its contents and the industry to which it relates. This introduction will serve as a basis both for the Display Day exhibit as well as a Division blog post and talk to Division staff about the project.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Basic knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel or similar programs.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired:

     
    • Study or and/or interest in the development of the natural resources and mining subsectors of U.S. industry in the early 20th century.
    •  
    • Collections processing experience
    • Experience handling collections materials from the late 19th/early 20th centuries that may be brittle or easily damaged.

     

  • #14 – WWII EO8807 - Digital Collections (Science, Technology and Business)

    Short description: The now fully digitized Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) was founded to organize scientific research for war purposes during World War II under Excecutive Order 8807 and included research topics on bombs, missiles, radar, malaria treatments and the Manhattan Project. Though it is digitized, it must now be made accessible to researchers through the creation of metadata by a Junior Fellow.

    Full description: In 2016, the Library of Congress completed digitalization for the Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) Collections held in the Technical Reports and Standards Section. These collections are frequently used and the ST&B Division hoped to preserve the original hardcopy sets by creating digitized sets. However, the current digitized versions are not accessible to researchers due to the lack of metadata and OCR. OSRD was a part of the United States federal government created to organize scientific research for war purposes during World War II under Executive Order 8807. The topics researched were broad, including projects focused on new bombs, missiles, radar, hand weapons, malaria treatments and versatile vehicles. Additionally the agency included the S-1 Section which became the Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic weapons. The project is collections-orientated and would allow a Fellow to become more familiar with History of Science specifically WWII military history and Library Science. The Junior Fellow(s) would be responsible for reviewing documents for specific division/topic(s) and creating metadata to ensure the collection is available to researchers visiting LC.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: The fellow should have a basic background in WWII history and ability to learn about metadata creation.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: History of science and technology background focusing specifically on WWII. Experience creating metadata.

  • #15 – Uncatalogued Treasures in Hebrew (Hebraic Section)

    Short description: A number of books in the Hebraic Section remain uncatalogued, with some collections including 35,000 Hebrew books published around the world on a wide variety of subject matter, dating from the late 18th to the 20th centuries. The Fellow will be tasked with organizing material; searching databases to identify rare books; and creating records accessible to the public.

    Full description: Among the riches of the Hebraic Section are a number of uncatalogued books in Hebrew, divided into separate collections by subject matter. One of these collections includes some 35,000 Hebrew books on a wide variety of rabbinic topics such as commentaries, ethical works, and monographs on history, philosophy, and religion. They date from the late 18th through early 20th centuries and were published in countries across the globe. Many of these books are quite rare, and over the course of the work the Junior Fellow may well turn up some real gems. The Junior Fellow will be asked to organize the books alphabetically by title, in order to make these potentially valuable books accessible to the public. Building on the success of the Junior Fellow who organized our Yiddish-language books in 2016, this year's Junior Fellow will also be asked to help re-house the more fragile materials using supplies provided by the Library's Preservation Division. During the course of the summer, the Junior Fellow will learn to use specialized databases in order to determine the significance and rarity of select items. He or she will also have the opportunity to study and research select items from the collections in order to create a display for the Junior Fellows Exhibit at the end of the summer- a quite festive affair! This fellowship is a wonderful learning opportunity for the true book lover - one who enjoys making order out of chaos and who doesn't mind getting his or her hands dusty!

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: A good reading knowledge of Hebrew. Good organizational skills. Willingness to handle fragile, sometimes crumbling books. Ability to work independently. Willingness to listen to supervision when necessary

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: A love of books - and of Hebrew books in particular. A desire to improve your Hebrew. Intellectual curiosity.

  • #16 – Hebrew Periodicals for Digital Age (Hebraic Section)

    Short description: The Hebraic Section at the Library of Congress has a wide range of periodical and newspapers that played an important role in the history of the Jewish people over the last 1000 years. The Fellow will use integrated Library Systems (ILS) to make the newspapers and periodicals available to researchers worldwide.

    Full description: Periodicals and newspapers have played an important role in the history of the Jewish people over the last 100 years, often forming the main organ for disseminating information and for forming public opinion throughout the Jewish world. They have also been avidly-read sources of information about the arts and culture, and about the academic study of Jewish life over the ages. The Hebraic Section at the Library of Congress has a very wide range of these periodicals and newspapers, starting from the first issues published in Russia and Germany over a century ago up to the very latest issues being published in our own day and age. While most of these periodicals and newspapers have been duly cataloged, information about their holdings is not available in the Integrated Library System (ILS), and it is this problem which our Junior Fellow will address. The Junior Fellow will learn to use the ILS to edit and add holdings statements for bound Hebrew and Yiddish serials and newspaper microfilm so that researchers worldwide will know the volume and dates for major journals and newspapers. This would essentially bring these important holdings into the digital age and thereby provide a major benefit for researchers all over the world.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Currently enrolled in a Library Degree Program (or seriously considering such a program). Interest in learning updated library techniques. Good computer skills. Ability to work independently but also to listen to supervision when necessary. Basic reading knowledge of Hebrew

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: A love of books (and of Hebrew books in particular). A desire to improve Hebrew language skills. Intellectual curiosity.

  • #17 – Burmese, Thai, Laos Rare Collections (Asian Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will help create metadata to make uncatalogued and unprocessed rare Burmese, Thai and Lao manuscripts in the Southeast Asia Collection of the Asian Division.

    Full description: This is a bibliographic control project of Burmese, Thai, and Lao rare manuscripts in the Southeast Asia Collection, Asian Division. The Southeast Asia Collection has over 70 un-cataloged accordion style manuscripts in three languages, over 150 un-cataloged palm-leaf manuscripts, and over 30 unprocessed archival boxes of miscellaneous documents. Since these items lack metadata, they are not searchable in the Library’s online catalog nor serviceable by the Southeast Asia Collection librarian or the Asian Division staff.

    In consultation with the Southeast Asia Collection librarian, the junior fellow will:

    1. create an Excel spreadsheet for each title;
    2. transliterate or romanize the titles and write a brief description for each item in the spreadsheet;
    3. photograph any items appropriate for a Junior Fellow display and a blog post at the conclusion of the fellowship.

     

    This project will allow for easy cataloging of these titles by a cataloger in the future. It will also lay a foundation for a future research guide for the Asian Division website.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Advanced reading knowledge of Burmese, Thai, and Lao. (Native speaker of Thai and/or Burmese desired.); Working knowledge of Pali desired; Knowledge of or familiarity with Thai and Burmese Buddhism; Interest in Buddhist studies; Interest in the history and culture of Burma, Thailand, and Laos; Basic knowledge of MS Excel to create a spreadsheet.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired:  General library experience. Past coursework in Southeast Asian studies, Buddhist studies, or history of Burma, Thailand, and Laos; Basic knowledge of Pali.

  • #18 – South Asian Newspapers 1880 – 2018 Project (Asian Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will help improve and verify holdings information for more than 250 newspapers and 17,000 microfilm reels in South Asian languages, some of which date back to the 19th century.

    Full description: This project in the Asian Division focuses on improving the bibliographic control and inventory of more than 250 newspapers on 17,000 microfilm reels in South Asian languages, a high-use resource for researchers in South Asian Studies. These newspapers, some of which have holdings from the 19th century, are primarily from India and Pakistan, along with additional titles from Bangladesh, Nepal, the Maldives, and Sri Lanka. The fellow will review each title’s microfilm reels and verify holdings information in its catalog record, making additions as needed. The fellow will also work with Asian Division staff to do the full inventory of each title’s microfilm reels, adding barcodes for item-level security where absent. Ensuring that these catalog records have accurate holdings information will better inform researchers about opportunities for research at the Library of Congress. Inventorying the physical holdings will enhance this collection’s security with regard to requests made through Interlibrary Loan. At the end of the project, the fellow will write an entry for the Library’s 4 Corners of the World blog, either summarizing their work experience or using this newspaper collection to investigate a topic of interest.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Demonstrable familiarity with South Asian Studies or the academic study of one or more South Asian countries (e.g., Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka) in a particular field or discipline. Basic reading knowledge of one or more South Asian languages, particularly Hindi or Urdu. However, applicants with reading knowledge of any South Asian language are encouraged to apply. Proficiency in Microsoft Office programs, especially Word and Excel.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Experience working in a public, research, or university library (e.g., reference, collection services, circulation). Experience working with primary sources in South Asian languages.

  • #19 – Russian Cyrillic Collection 1880 – 1940 (European Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will work to add catalog records to the Voyager ILS to the Russian Cyrillic Priority 4 Collection which consists of 600 Russian books published between 1880 and 1940.

    Full description: The Cyrillic Priority 4 Russian Collection now consists of only 600 Russian books published between 1880 and 1940. Until 1997, the Collection consisted of nearly 5,000 items, but most have been cataloged over the past 20 years, especially with the help of Junior Fellows; online records are available in the Voyager ILS for them, except for the remaining 600. The intern will learn basic cataloging and LC transliteration, and will search LC’s ILS to ensure that we have not already cataloged another copy. The intern should catalog 400-500 items, the average of how many were cataloged by previous Junior Fellows. This would nearly complete cataloging of the remaining Cyrillic 4 Russian items. All subject areas are involved. Less-than-full cataloging of these items means that the intern is not obligated to add authority records or full LC subject headings. The project is collections-oriented; it involves cataloging. The intern should have a basic reading knowledge of Russian, and ideally will be in a library science program. Involves one U.S./Anglo Division mentor for cataloging instruction one European Division and a Russian Area Specialist mentor for learning Russian book culture, selecting display items, and review of transliteration.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Good reading knowledge of the Russian language. Background in Russian literature, history, or culture. Ability to communicate clearly in English both orally and in writing. Aptitude for working with integrated library systems, including input/update. Experience in searching online catalogs, e.g., WorldCat, Library of Congress Online Catalog, university or other research library catalogs. Patience for concentrated library work and research. Attention to detail

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of Library of Congress transliteration scheme for rendering Russian Cyrillic into Latin letters. Understanding of the organization of knowledge through coursework in a library science program. Cataloging or collections processing experience.

  • #20 – Carvalho Monteiro Collection (Collections Management Division)

    Short description: The Carvalho Monteiro (CM) Library is an approximately 30,000-volume private library created by Brazilian-born Portuguese businessman, Antonio August Carvalho Monteiro (1850-1920). The Fellow will process a number of volumes and enter the data in the CM tracking database.

    Full description: The Carvalho Monteiro (CM) Library is an approximately 30,000-volume private library created by Brazilian-born Portuguese businessman, Antonio Augusto Carvalho Monteiro (1850-1920). Purchased by the Library in 1927 and 1929, it was considered the largest acquisitions by the Library at that time and the backbone of the Hispanic Collection. There is no documentation with a list of books purchased. Once acquired, the collection was dispersed among several special collecting divisions. The vast majority of the books and other materials published after 1801 was primarily cataloged as part of the Library's large general collection without provenance. The Carvalho Monteiro Collection Project designed by the Collections Officer in CMD in 2012 consists in finding, reviewing and identifying items from the CM library in order to create a detailed list of items purchased by the Library as well as update the ILS records for those items with the provenance to give access to researchers worldwide. Preservation actions is a major component of this project for items that are fragile or damaged. The CM library is typical of its time because of its focus on Portuguese culture and history, but unique as it reflects Carvalho Monteiro's special interest in the flora and fauna of Brazil and extensive source material on art, architecture and decorative arts in a variety of foreign language texts including Portuguese, French, German, Spanish, and Latin.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired:

    • Proficient in Microsoft Programs.
    • Proficient in Excell and Powerpoint
    • General experience in collections processing.
    • Attention to detail.
    • Interest in History.
    • Proficient in Adobe Photoshop

     

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Interest Knowledge of Latin languages, such as Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, and French is not required, but preferable

  • #21 – Miniature Books Collection (Collections Management Division)

    Short description: The Miniature Collection consists of books smaller than 5 inches. The Fellow will have varying duties such as searching and gathering miniature books from the stacks, researching, and learning to recognize damage to the collection.

    Full description: The Miniature collection consists of books smaller than 5 inches that are constantly gathered throughout the general collections for security and preservation reasons. To protect these books from damage or from getting lost among larger volumes, this collection is pulled from the stacks, processed and housed inside special acid free containers to be stored off-site. This project consists of searching and gathering miniature books from the stacks and other selected areas and processing them for off-site storage, which includes removing acidic enclosures, rehousing, making custom housings, applying security targets, preparing items for inventory, housing and tracking items in the Miniature database. In addition, it has a strong research component, as the Fellow is requested to write a short paper about one selected aspect of the History of Miniature Books. In addition, Junior Fellow will receive special training in care and handling of library materials and collections care provided by CALM's Collections Officer. He/she will also be trained to recognize damage to the collection, including brittle and too brittle to serve materials.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Proficient in Microsoft Programs. Proficient in Excell and Powerpoint. General experience in collections processing. Attention to detail. Interest in History. Proficient in Adobe Photoshop

  • #22 – Advancing Paper Characterization (Preservation Research & Testing Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will work with preservation scientists to characterize reference papers with destructive and non-invasive test methods, linking the reference paper types to what we see in the Library collection materials from specific time periods, in an effort to increase access to scientific information regarding the Library’s physical collection materials.

    Full description: The Center for Library Analytical Scientific Samples - Digital (CLASS-D) is a transformation initiative to increase access to scientific information about Library collection materials. Even as we move to digital services, much of our collection is paper-based, and there are many different paper types, differences leading to challenges for preservation arising from different fiber composition (rag, pulp etc.), sizings, additives, optical brighteners, fillers, etc., that impact how long paper will exist in a stable condition. The Junior Fellow will work with PRTD scientists to characterize these reference papers with destructive and non-invasive test methods, linking the reference paper types to what we see in the Library collection materials from specific time periods, to see if we can start to identify specific components that are adding to higher risk for certain paper compositions. The Barrow collection (1,000 books from 1500-1900 CE) will then be used as a test case to link these paper compositions with specific time periods, paper types. As we identify “bad actors” as time permits, accelerated aging will be undertaken on these reference materials to look at the potential impact over time. The fellow would create a matrix of material types and composition, correlating data for advancing our knowledge of degradation seen in paper-based collection materials. Junior Fellows have the opportunity to work with a diverse group of PRTD staff and the visiting scientists, fellows, and interns who partner with the Division on research projects.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired:

    1. Fellow should have some background experience with chemistry, scientific laboratory experience, it would be suggested that this experience would mean that they had completed at least two courses in chemistry or related areas and be able to demonstrate good ability in these areas.
    2. Fellow should be comfortable with data organization and manipulation of database and / or other software platforms.
    3. Prior laboratory and experience in the sciences is highly desirable.
    4. Working knowledge of statistics and computer software, including Excel, Microsoft Word and Powerpoint.
    5. Ability to follow instructions and attention to detail.
    6. Good verbal communication skills.
    7. Proficiency in writing reports.

     

    Preferred Knowledge Desired:

    1. Fellow shall have completed at least two courses in chemistry or related areas and be able to demonstrate good ability in these areas.
    2. Fellow should be comfortable with data organization and manipulation database platforms.
    3. Prior laboratory and experience in the sciences is highly desirable.
    4. Useful to have matlab or other statistical data analytical experience.
    5. Fellow should be proficient in the use of computer software, including Excel, Microsoft Word and Powerpoint.
  • #23 – Data Mapping Preservation Needs (Binding and Collections Care Division)

    Short description: Fellows will participate in a physical survey to help identify the general health of the Library’s physical materials. Fellows will carry out physical examinations and collect data on the conditions of the materials in order to identify the needs of the materials for preservation.

    Full description: BCCD is updating a 2014 survey of the General and Reference collections in the Jefferson and Adams building stacks for the Library of Congress which identified the general health of the collection, including preservation actions needed to ensure future access as well as the status of inventory and catalog records. BCCD staff are currently analyzing ILS records by class identifying preservation actions since this 2014 survey. The junior fellow will participate in a physical survey to confirm or adjust the findings of the ILS records analysis. The project is collections oriented, and the fellow will serve under the close supervision of the Chief, BCCD. The 2014 survey of the general and reference collections started by junior fellows and completed by preservation staff has provided direction for preservation activities in the years following the survey. Similar impact on preservation work in the coming five years is anticipated from this project.  Fellows will be expected to carry out physical examination of general and reference collections for selected classes (based on focused preservation efforts since the 2014 survey) and collect data using a handheld computer and other technical equipment to document the condition of collections. They will be expected to manipulate and analyze the data which they collected and to report on findings. One fellow will be able to complete a survey of up to 9,000 volumes and with two fellows, up to 18,000 volumes can be examined.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired:  Ability to remove volumes from shelf and examine. Ability to employ handheld scanner. Ability to move between the three Hill campus buildings and in the general and reference stacks. Knowledge of Excel. Knowledge of how to use an Online Public Access Catalog. Skill to manipulate data in Excel. Skill to upload data collected with scanners into Excel. Skills for writing reports.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of MARC Records. Knowledge of Access Databases.

  • #24 – Prelinger Archive Film Formats (Moving Image Processing Unit)

    Short description: The Prelinger Archives holds a wide variety of American advertising, educational, industrial, and amateur films on topics of the 20th century. Fellows will inspect, analyze and identify selections of various pre-print elements and release prints for preservation and online streaming.

    Full description: Organized in late 1982, the Prelinger Archives brings together a wide variety of American advertising, educational, industrial, and amateur films. Topics are varied and diverse and depict everyday life, culture, and industry in America throughout the 20th century. The work involved will be to inspect, analyze, and identify a selection of various pre-print elements and release prints for preservation and potential online streaming. The Jr. Fellow will become familiar with established film handling and identification procedures, complexities associated with processing ephemeral film collections, research strategies to identify content, and the historical and social contexts that led to the distribution of these films.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to handle and identify pre-production film elements and print material; collections processing experience; skills in Microsoft Word and Excel; ability to work collegially in a team environment; strong research and writing skills; excellent organization skills; detail oriented; flexible to adapt to procedures not covered by standards; interest in educational, industrial, and sponsored films; ability to lift up to 40 lbs.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Skill in describing moving image formats; knowledge of U.S. history and social movements from 1930s to the 1990s; experience in cataloging moving images; knowledge of the history of film formats or photographic processes; knowledge of film distribution practices for educational, industrial, and sponsored films; project management experience.

  • #25 – Recorded Sound Mavis Processing (Recorded Sound Processing Unit)

    Short Description: The Junior Fellow will assist in the pre-processing and processing of a large number of audio and manuscript materials from the Recorded Sound Section, which include materials in the Universal Music Group collection.

    Full Description: The Recorded Sound Section holds a large number of unprocessed audio and manuscript materials. This collections-oriented project will focus on assisting with preprocessing and processing tasks for various collections, including some experience with materials in the Universal Music Group collection. The covered subject areas could span any topics that can be captured on audio formats. It is highly likely many items worked on during this project will contain musical content, so some knowledge and experience with music would be helpful. The Fellow(s) will be assigned various preprocessing tasks, such as creating inventories, researching information, and performing conservation treatments, as well as describing items in MAVIS. The Fellow(s) will also gain experience in sound recording format identification and handling, and if interested, will have the opportunity to learn more about sound recording copyright and preservation issues. Various section staff will assist in overseeing work and development.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Basic computer skills, including familiarity with Excel; interest in sound recordings; knowledge of music.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Experience in processing and/or describing audio materials; archival experience.

  • #26 – Native American Audio (1940s – Present) (Recorded Sound Processing Unit)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will highlight the recent history of Native American recording culture of traditional and contemporary popular music by promoting the visibility and maintaining access to the recordings available in the Recorded Sound Section.

    Full description: Native Americans in the United States have a long and complex relationship with sound recording. The Library holds extensive and well-researched collections of early recordings, such as those found in the Federal Cylinder Project collections (Canyon Records, American Indian Soundchiefs, Indian House, and Indian Sounds, etc). Commercial indigenous recordings are often less visible but help to document the many different ways that the medium of sound recording has been and is being explored by native people. From maintaining access to traditional song forms, supporting the intertribal cooperation found in the pow wow, to expressing the contemporary lived experience of Native Americans today, this project looks to highlight the more recent history of Native American recording culture of traditional and contemporary popular music and singing through the collections of the Recorded Sound Section at the Library of Congress.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Writing and communication skills. Experience with search tools and discovery methods. Ability to use integrated library systems and conduct research.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired:

    • Knowledge of librarianship and information management principles.
    • Ability to use integrated library systems to conduct research. Knowledge of audio and moving image collections. Knowledge of American history.
  • #27 – Indigenous Law Portal (Ecuador) (Library Services and the Law Library)

    Short description: The Portal for Indigenous Peoples Law is a joint project of American Bar Association, ABA/LS and the Law Library of Congress (LLC). Link available at: http://www.loc.gov/law/help/indigenous-law-guide/americas/. The fellow will research secondary literature that will mostly include web resources focusing on materials from Ecuador and Paraguay. Full description: The Portal for Indigenous Peoples Law, a joint project of ABA/LS and the Law Library of Congress (LLC), is up on the LLC home page since 2015 and had – according to 2018 Web statistics – a total of 171 visiting countries: http:www.loc.gov/law/help/indigenous-law-guide/americas/  It is a free, service-orientated LC web resource, that disseminates current hard to find information, and offers insight in this highly specialized and not widely understood field of law. The Portal offers information on the Peoples of North and Central America. For South America, the 3rd face of the project, materials for Peru and Bolivia are ready for upload. Now Ecuador and Paraguay are targeted. For countries in Latin America, primary print sources on the subjects are rare. The junior fellow’s research for data concentrates on primary sources and secondary literature; however, from past experience, it will most likely resort to websites or documents of national government and of widespread indigenous organizations in support/defense of indigenous rights (“Grey literature”), that are often the sole resource for information on indigenous communities.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Proficiency in reading Spanish (most of the research is conducted from Spanish resources/materials). Although language fluency is a key to the project, the intern needs to be willing to expand language facility since terminology expressing legal concepts adds another dimension to the work. Researcher will involve use of ethnographic and anthropological works, detailed maps (to eventually be used as visual access to the Portal), as well as general political/constitutional documents and in some instances use of national censuses to corroborate the data as much as possible. Proficiency in OPAC searching. Proficiency in working with Excel spreadsheets.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Portuguese or French language skills are desirable. Basic understanding of classification and ClassificationWeb, its linking functionality, and other LC authority files would be desirable, but can be taught. Where resources (web or otherwise) are inconclusive, the junior fellow needs sometimes to resort to correspondence with government agencies/organizations or advocacy/development groups concerned with the rights and welfare of native communities. HTML skills.

  • #28 – African American Veteran History (Veterans History Project)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will assist in developing a greater resource of the holdings and metadata for the manuscript collections relating to African-American veterans for the Library’s Veterans History Project (VHP).

    Full description: The Veterans History Project (VHP) proposes an intern assignment for two Junior Fellows to assist with improved knowledge of holdings and creation of descriptive metadata for manuscript collections relating to African-American veterans. Collections will primarily consist of wartime correspondence, but may also include photographs, diaries, artwork, or recorded oral history interviews in a variety of audio and video formats.  The intern will survey VHP’s collections to identify manuscript materials with limited descriptive metadata, write descriptive notes detailing the content of each collection, perform basic preservation measures as needed, and create Encoded Archival Description (EAD) finding aids, LibGuides, and/or Story Maps for selected collections or groups of collections with high research value. S/he will also survey collections to assess opportunities for interpretation, such as inclusion in displays or future transcription projects, and write blog posts and other social media content. The intern will gain experience working with archival materials, interpreting collections, and authoring EAD-encoded finding aids, LibGuides and/or Story Maps. Completion of this project will increase the discoverability of collection material relating to African-American veterans in response to increased researcher interest.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Ability to communicate effectively orally. Ability to communicate effectively in writing. Ability to analyze archival materials. Ability to plan, organize, and execute work within specified deadlines. Ability to use computerized search tools, databases, and functions. Knowledge of military history.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of archival processes and procedures. Knowledge of standard archival descriptive practices and tools (EAD, DACS, MARC).

  • #29 – Manuscript Reading Room Internship (Manuscript Division)

    Short description: The Junior Fellow will respond to reference inquiries received via telephone, electronic means, or in-person; analyze reference requests; investigate sources of information; draft, revise, and deliver responses; retrieve and re-shelve manuscript materials; and compile reader usage statistics.

    Full description: Named after a longtime Manuscript Division staff member who retired as the head of the division's Reference & Reader Services Section in 2005, the Mary Wolfskill Trust Fund is used to support internships in the Manuscript Division that will foster interest in archival work among graduate and undergraduate students, particularly minorities or students from smaller and lesser-known schools. The Elizabeth Brown Pryor Internship is another endowed Manuscript Division Program named after a long-time Library patron, who in recognition of the Manuscript Reading Room’s staff, left a legacy to support the operations of the Manuscript Reading Room. Overseeing a collection of approximately 65 million primary source documents relating to American history and culture, the Manuscript Reading Room is a service-oriented focal point for members of Congress and their staff, the academic community, journalists, genealogists, documentary editors, and the general public conducting research in American history and culture. Among the nearly 12,000 collections available through the Manuscript Reading Room are the personal papers of such notable Americans as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Walt Whitman, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and the records of non-governmental organizations such as the NAACP, National Woman’s Party, and National Urban League.  Junior Fellows are employed in the Manuscript Reading Room, where they assist researchers in accessing the division's collections. Under the direction of the head of the Reference & Reader Services Section and a designated reference librarian mentor, interns respond to reference inquiries received via telephone, electronic means, or in-person; analyze reference requests; investigate sources of information; draft, revise, and deliver responses; retrieve and re-shelve manuscript materials; and compile reader usage statistics. The intern may also work on special finding aids projects that improve researcher access to the materials. Through an exposure to various aspects of archival reference and description, the intern will gain an introductory knowledge of the principles, concepts, and techniques of archival management and reference.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired: Demonstrated knowledge of American history and culture. Ability to work effectively and collaboratively in a team setting. Ability to communicate effectively in writing. Ability to prioritize work and meet deadlines. Ability to think critically and propose resolutions to problems.

    Preferred Knowledge Desired: Knowledge of integrated library systems, basic library applications, and other information technologies. Experience working in a research library environment.

  • #30 – Art Buchwald Processing (Manuscript Division)

    Short description: The Manuscript Division seeks a Junior Fellow to participate in hands-on work involving arranging and describing significant series of materials of renowned humorist and columnist Art Buchwald. The fellow will develop and understanding and ability to apply archival principle of arrangement and description.

    Full description: The Manuscript Division Preparation Section will offer the selected Junior Fellow with an opportunity to participate in the hands-on work and decision-making involved in arranging and describing a significant series within the papers of renowned humorist and columnist Art Buchwald. The collection consists of correspondence, speeches, plays and screenplays, book manuscripts, newspaper columns, photographs, audio and moving image materials, and other papers from Buchwald’s professional and personal life and including his association with prominent individuals from the fields of broadcasting, journalism, publishing, politics, and entertainment. Principal subjects covered include political and cultural history as well as Buchwald’s activism in the areas of mental health awareness, disability rights, and end-of-life cases. The fellow will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of and ability to apply archival principles of arrangement and description. He or she will acquire those skills through hands-on learning under the guidance of a senior archives specialist who will teach them all stages of archival processing. The fellow also will have the opportunity to sharpen their skills to analyze highly valuable historical records. The Junior Fellow will draw on the educational support provided by the senior archives specialist but will also have occasion to work with other Manuscript Division staff on certain tasks like cataloguing, preparation of finding aids, and preservation assessments.

    Skills/Knowledge Desired:

    1. Knowledge of American history and culture.
    2. Ability to organize, describe, and preserve archival materials.
    3. Knowledge of a variety of automated tools and technologies such as integrated library systems and office applications such as word processing and spreadsheets.
    4. Ability to plan work and meet deadlines.
    5. Ability to think critically and propose resolutions to problems.
    6. Ability to work effectively and collaboratively in a team setting.
    7. Ability to communicate in writing

     

    Preferred Knowledge Desired:

    1. Knowledge of American history and culture.
    2. Ability to organize, describe, and preserve archival materials

     

    Junior Fellows Program Specific Frequently Asked Questions

    1. How competitive is the Junior Fellows Summer Intern Program?

      Based on our experience with other fellowship programs offered here at the Library of Congress, we expect this to be a highly competitive program, with a large number of applications from very qualified and motivated students. Therefore, we must strictly adhere to the requirements for application packages and the deadline for their submission. Interested applicants are encouraged to carefully read the application criteria and procedures.

    2. What are the selecting officials looking for in the application?

      Selecting officials may consider course selection, work experience, language skills, and interests related to the various subject areas noted on the announcement. While not required, experience or education in library-related fields can be a plus.

    3. I am interested in more than one subject area of this program. Can I apply to more than one? Must I submit separate applications for each?

      In your cover letter, state explicitly your areas of interest. Your education, experience, and general background should affirm your selections and demonstrate your wish for serious consideration for each subject area you identified. Submit only one application package.

    4. Do you provide financial aid?

      No. Fellows receive a stipend of $450.00 per week, not financial aid. They are also eligible for Transit Benefits, a transit subsidy program for qualified individuals who use the Metro system, Virginia Rail Express, MARC commuter trains, and county and commercial buses and qualified commercial van pools to commute to their jobs at the Library.

    5. Do you provide housing?

      No. Housing is the full responsibility of the fellow. The Library of Congress does not make specific recommendations for housing. The Library of Congress is located on Capitol Hill in Southeast Washington, DC. The nearest metro station is Capitol South on the blue, orange, and silver lines. However, the red line stop at Union Station is an approximately 15 minute walk to the Library. Union Station is also the closest point where commuter trains from Maryland and Virginia stop. Fellows may consider arranging housing through local colleges or alumni organizations. 

    6. Do you provide parking options for Junior Fellows?

      No. Fellows are strongly encouraged not to bring private cars to Washington; parking near the Library is very limited and expensive. The Library of Congress is located on Capitol Hill in Southeast Washington, DC. The nearest Metro station is Capitol South. Metro routes may be found at: www.wmata.com External

    7. How many academic credits do I receive in the program?

      The Library of Congress is not an academic institution and does not grant course credits. However, you may want to check with your school about receiving credits for your fellowship.

    8. I am not available to start the fellowship on May 28, 2019. Am I still eligible?

      The schedule and the length of the fellowship direct that we require all fellows to report on the same day.

    9. Can my fellowship lead to a full-time job?

      The fellowships come with no guarantee for permanent employment. However, we encourage those interested in careers at the Library of Congress to look at all job opportunities listed at the USAJOBS website. The new skills and experience gained during your time at the Library can be used as a stepping stone and the supervisor of your fellowship can be a valuable reference for your future job searches.

    10. Will these fellowships be offered in the Fall/Winter?

      No. This is a summer fellowship program only.

      For additional information about the Library of Congress, visit http://www.loc.gov Click on the Overview tab to see the other offerings at the Library of Congress.